Practice Manager Survey 2015

A short Survey about GP Practice Manager Salaries – Twenty Questions

The aim of this survey is to collect sufficient information from practice managers to try to demonstrate that their salaries do not reflect the extent of their role and responsibilities in relation to the size of the practice.  For instance, I have knowledge of two practices with around 8,000 patients paying their practice managers £35,000 and £48,000 pa respectively. You may well ask yourself the question why. Would you mind completing the survey and returning it to my email address – robert.campbell@orange.net. I will publish the results on my web site gpsurgerymanager.co.uk

QUESTIONNAIRE

  1. What is the salary in the range of as the Practice Manager?

Below £24,999                                                                                                   (   )

Between £25,000 and £29,999                                                                      (   )

Between £30,000 and £34,999                                                                      (   )

Between £35,000 and £39,999                                                                      (   )

Between £40,000 and £44,999                                                                      (   )

£45,000 and above                                                                                           (   )

Please tick appropriate box.

  1. Are you an employee of the practice?                                                               (YES)            (NO)
  2. How many weekly hours are you contracted to work?                               (         ) please insert number
  3. How many hours per week do you think you actually work?                  (         ) please insert number
  4. Are you a non-medical partner (not an employee)?                                    (YES)             (NO)
  5. What is the current practice list size?                                                          (                ) please insert number
  6. Do you run Practice payroll software in the practice?                                (YES)           (NO)
  7. Do you run the Practice account software in the practice?                      (YES)           (NO)
  8. Do you use an outside agency to run the payroll?                                         (YES)           (NO)
  9. How many Surgery premises are there in the practice?                            (         ) please insert number
  10. How many Whole time equivalent GPs work in the practice?           (              ) please insert number

Whole time GPs work 5 days per week for 9 sessions.

  1. How many self-employed GPs work in the practice?                             (          ) please insert number
  2. How many salaried GPs work in the practice?                                        (          ) please insert number
  3. How many WTE staff are employed in the practice?                              (          ) please insert number

WTE – Whole Time Equivalent based on 37.5 hours per week both practice staff and nurses

  1. How many WTE nurses are employed in the practice?                         (          ) please insert number
  2. Do you have any paid/unpaid NHS outside commitments?                (YES) (NO)

Example – Practice Manager Representative on CCG

  1. How many hours is the surgery open each week?                                    (          ) please insert number
  2. Has your practice been the subject of a CQC inspection?                    (YES) (NO)

If YES please insert practice code (                    )

  1. Is your practice a training practice?                                                                (YES)   (NO)

If YES how many trainees are attached to the Practice (          ) insert number

  1. What is the general location of your practice?                                       cropped-Kingfisher-Logo.jpg (          ) please insert post code

Please save your completed form as a pdf file and return to robert.campbell@orange.net

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Managing a GP Practice – Practice Solutions

Practice Solutions

I have worked with seven totally different practices during my working life and have met managers from over 100 other GP practices. Each practice has its own way of doing things and it’s own problems. Each has its own way of keeping financial records.

Running appointments systems and managing the number of doctors and nurses to keep on top of patient demand would require its own book to discuss although I have found the the general answer is that the doctors will run their practice appointments the way they want to and engage more help only if they are not too much out of pocket. So keeping hold of the purse strings is extremely important but is it done well?

This leads then to the financial management of a GP practice. What I have found is that the way practice accounts are kept can be a revelation. Bearing in mind that there are excellent payroll packages on the market that are relatively easy to use, such as Iris or Sage I wonder why some practices still farm out this work to accountants or payroll specialists or still do it manually (Yes I found one practice).

More surprisingly I found in a number of practices a lack of adequate practice accounts. Twice I found handwritten journals only partly completed. In another I found spreadsheets again partly completed and no breakdown or record of NHS Income.

Where Sage, Iris or Quicken software was used it had not been set up to record and categorise all income and expenditure. These practices were still highly dependent on the annual accounts being prepared by their accountants. In one case I found that the accounting software had been used to limited effect with no proper category allocated to income and expenditure. In fact dormant or defunct categories had been used for income no longer paid and categories for new payments had not been created. The fact that information about NHS payments made to the Practice could be downloaded from Open Exeter had not been utilised.

In simple terms I would expect the practice accounts to be kept with such level of detail that would match the categories shown in the annual accounts. At the end of the financial year a back up of the accounts could be provided to the accountants. However I have tended to find a reluctance to buy working accounts software by accountants.

As a final thought the extent to which a practice manager handles and prepares practice accounts would surely help determine the salary he or she receives!

(12)

Are you a New GP Practice Manager?

IMG_0033Are you a New GP Practice Manager?

What to do on your first day?

• Meet all of the doctors
• Meet all of the staff individually
• Set yourself up on payroll
• Obtain an NHS email address

What can you expect to find on your first day?

1. Piles of ‘junk’ paper and files
2. Unbanked cheques
3. Miscellaneous Cash in boxes
4. Incomplete practice accounts; not reconciled
5. No paying in books or cheque books
6. No record of passwords
7. No NHS income statements
8. Incomplete set of bank statements
9. No record of significant events
10. NHS claims not made or submitted
11. Invoices not paid
12. No complaints file
13. Out of date practice web site
14. No practice leaflet printed
15. Out of date NHS Choices web site
16. No telephone contacts list
17. No email contacts list
18. No record of payslips issued
19. Personal files for staff with no contracts or detail of salary
20. No personal files for doctors

Ten things you might have to do in your first week?
1. Set up password access to the Clinical System
2. Obtain or update your own NHS email account
3. Obtain or update your NHS Smart Card
4. Obtain authorization to cash cheques at bank
5. Obtain authorization to access banking on line
6. Obtain password for NHS Pensions Agency
7. Obtain password for Open Exeter
8. Meet all staff
9. Set yourself up on the staff payroll
10. Set yourself up on the NHS Pension Scheme

Ten things to look for in the Accounts

1. What are the regular drawings for the doctors?
2. When are invoices usually paid?
3. How are payments made to Inland Revenue?
4. How are payments made to NHS Pensions Agency
5. What regular payments are made by standing order?
6. What payments are made by Direct Debit?
7. Do you have copies of lease agreements?
8. Find the ‘file’ of bank statements?
9. Find the most recent set of annual accounts
10. What day are staff paid – you will need overtime and notes of any increments due

Six things to look for in your first month

1. Are staff contracts all up to date?
2. Has a CRB check been carried out for all staff?
3. Are protocols, policies and procedures documented for a CQC Inspection?
4. Is a rent review due with the District Valuer
5. Submit Inland Revenue returns
6. What are the methods of making claims: by email, by invoice, via Open Exeter, CQRS etc

Four things to do each Quarter

1. Submit all NHS claims due
2. Check all income received
3. Submit VAT claim – if registered
4. Check practice list size and report to doctors

Nine things to do at the end of the NHS/Financial Year

1. Reconcile all banks statements
2. Submit all claims due for the year
3. Submit any annual reports required for Enhanced Services
4. Close down payroll
5. Submit Inland Revenue Returns on line
6. Submit annual pension returns
7. Issue P60’s and annual pension statements
8. Close down CQRS/QOF
9. Gather and submit information to Practice accountants

And in doing all these things meet the doctors and staff regularly and hold a training half day once a month. All that should keep you busy and there’s a lot more that will just happen.

Six Tips for coping when it all gets too much!

1. Treat all junk mail for what it is – bin it
2. Touch paper once
3. Do not return telephone calls – they will ring you again
4. Do not meet unannounced visitors
5. The most important things are urgent
6. The least important things are not urgent

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT AND ADD MORE TO THE LISTS

Email – kingfisherpm@hotmail.com

(14)

Keeping Accounts?


Practice Solutions

I have worked with seven totally different practices during my working life and have met managers from over 100 other GP practices. Each practice has its own way of doing things and it’s own problems. Each has its own way of keeping financial records.

Running appointments systems and managing the number of doctors and nurses to keep on top of patient demand would require its own book to discuss although I have found the the general answer is that the doctors will run their practice appointments the way they want to and engage more help only if they are not too much out of pocket. So keeping hold of the purse strings is extremely important but is it done well?

This leads then to the financial management of a GP practice. What I have found is that the way practice accounts are kept can be a revelation. Bearing in mind that there are excellent payroll packages on the market that are relatively easy to use, such as Iris or Sage I wonder why some practices still farm out this work to accountants or payroll specialists or still do it manually (Yes I found one practice).

More surprisingly I found in a number of practices a lack of adequate practice accounts. Twice I found handwritten journals only partly completed. In another I found spreadsheets again partly completed and no breakdown or record of NHS Income.

Where Sage, Iris or Quicken software was used it had not been set up to record and categorise all income and expenditure. These practices were still highly dependent on the annual accounts being prepared by their accountants. In one case I found that the accounting software had been used to limited effect with no proper category allocated to income and expenditure. In fact dormant or defunct categories had been used for income no longer paid and categories for new payments had not been created. The fact that information about NHS payments made to the Practice could be downloaded from Open Exeter had not been utilised.

In simple terms I would expect the practice accounts to be kept with such level of detail that would match the categories shown in the annual accounts. At the end of the financial year a back up of the accounts could be provided to the accountants. However I have tended to find a reluctance to buy working accounts software by accountants.

As a final thought the extent to which a practice manager handles and prepares practice accounts would surely help determine the salary he or she receives!

(7)


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